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dc.contributor.advisorColantuono, Anthonyen_US
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Viannaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-22T05:41:56Z
dc.date.available2019-06-22T05:41:56Z
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/4mnz-be0q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/22226
dc.description.abstractThe seventeenth century marked the emergence in Italy of a novel type of painted illusion: quadratura. Its practitioners created a new genre of art, with ceilings as its domain, which relied upon linear perspective and the real setting of the illusion to produce a sense of wonder in beholders and to persuade them of a rhetorical message. This thesis focuses on three illusionistic ceilings: the Apotheosis of Saint Clement, the Allegory of Divine Providence, and the Glorification of Saint Ignatius. In treating these works as varied manifestations of the same artistic and cultural milieu, this investigation produces a model, or foundational set of tools, with which to analyze the creation and reception of illusionistic ceilings of seventeenth-century Rome.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePerception, Space, Movement: Illusionistic Ceilings in Seventeenth-Century Romeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArt History and Archaeologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledArt historyen_US


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