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dc.contributor.authorChakraborty, Arnab
dc.contributor.authorMishra, Sabyasachee
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-14T14:15:50Z
dc.date.available2019-03-14T14:15:50Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/af5i-yq0q
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/21791
dc.description.abstractLand use and neighborhood characteristics have long been linked to transit ridership. Large-scale agencies, such as state departments of transportations, often make decisions that affect land use pattern and transit services. However, the interdependencies between them are seldom harnessed in decision-making. In this article, we develop and apply a transit ridership model based on land use and other neighborhood characteristics for an entire state. We then discuss its implications for regional and state-level decision-making. We chose the state of Maryland as our study area. Using a number of criteria, we subdivided the state into 1151 statewide modeling zones (SMZs) and, for each zone in the base year (2000), developed a set of variables, including developed land under different uses, population and employment densities, free-flow and congested speeds, current transport capacities, and accessibility to different transport modes. We estimated two sets of OLS-regression models for the base year data: one on the statewide SMZs dataset and other on subsets of urban, suburban and rural typologies. We find that characteristics of land use, transit accessibility, income, and density are strongly significant and robust for the statewide and urban areas datasets. We also find that determinants and their coefficients vary across urban, suburban and rural areas suggesting the need for finely tuned policy. Next we used a suite of econometric and land use models to generate two scenarios for the horizon year (2030) – business as usual and high-energy price – and estimated ridership changes between them. We use the resulting scenarios to show how demand could vary by parts of the state and demonstrate the framework’s value in large-scale decision-making.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis paper was peer-reviewed by TRB and presented at the 91st Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C., January 2012.
dc.subjectLand Useen_US
dc.subjectTransportationen_US
dc.subjecttransit ridershipen_US
dc.subjectmodelen_US
dc.subjectMarylanden_US
dc.subjectstatewideen_US
dc.subjectscenariosen_US
dc.subjecttransportation planningen_US
dc.titleA Case for Increased State Role in Transit Planning: Analyzing Land Use and Transit Ridership Connections Using Scenariosen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md)


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