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dc.contributor.advisorAgarwal, Rajshreeen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWaguespack, David M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorOlson, Danielen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-01T06:38:12Z
dc.date.available2019-02-01T06:38:12Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/tmwh-9br0
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/21635
dc.description.abstractStrategic human capital research explores heterogeneity in firm performance based on differences in firms’ abilities to leverage human capital. Much of the discussion in this literature focuses on how firms can exploit isolating mechanisms that limit the mobility of employees. This dissertation studies two important facets of strategic human capital research related to the mobility of employees. The first essay explores how a labor market frictions lens can connect the strategic human capital literature to the employee entrepreneurship literature, two complementary but largely disparate literatures. The examination of the impact of various labor market frictions on employee mobility to competitor firms and employee transitions to entrepreneurship suggests that the outcomes of some frictions are divergent across the two literatures, the outcomes of some are aligned, and the outcomes of some are ambiguous. The complex interplay of labor market frictions provides opportunities for future research specifically exploring the intersection of the strategic human capital and employee entrepreneurship literatures. The second essay of explores how multi-location firms facilitate the spread of compensation increases across labor markets. Prior research cites the threat of employee mobility as the primary mechanism for the spread of compensation increases across locations. Multi-location firms that straddle more than one labor market, however, must manage employees across labor markets. I propose that internal firm processes, including social comparison between employees of the firm in different locations, may lead firms to raise compensation for employees in other locations when addressing competitive pressure in a given location. In doing so, these multi-location firms put pressure on local labor market competitors to also raise compensation, leading to compensation increases across distinct labor markets without reference to mobility constraints that dominate the strategic human capital literature.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEmployee Mobility, Employee Entrepreneurship, and Employee Value Capture: Labor Market Frictions and the Impact of Social Comparison Costs on Compensationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness and Management: Management & Organizationen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledManagementen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEntrepreneurshipen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEmployee Entrepreneurshipen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEmployee Mobilityen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledLabor Market Frictionsen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledSocial Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledStrategic Human Capitalen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledValue Captureen_US


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