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dc.contributor.advisorHatfield, Bradley Den_US
dc.contributor.authorJaquess, Kyle Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-13T05:44:05Z
dc.date.available2018-09-13T05:44:05Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2901ZK3G
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/21370
dc.description.abstractThe ability to effectively and efficiently process task-relevant information is a critical element to a wide range of cognitive-motor activities. Indeed, various studies have illustrated that elite performers exhibit more refined neuro-cognitive processes than novices. However, it is unclear how these neuro-cognitive information processing abilities develop as skill is acquired. In this dissertation, I provide some evidence to address this gap in the literature. Study 1, entitled “Empirical evidence for the relationship between cognitive workload and attentional reserve” (Jaquess et al., 2017), provided evidence illustrating the relationship between mental workload and attentional reserve. Study 2, entitled “Changes in mental workload and motor performance throughout multiple practice sessions under various levels of task difficulty”, builds from the knowledge gained from Study 1 and extends it to a cognitive-motor learning/practice context over the course of four days. Finally, Study 3, entitled “How engaged are you? An investigation of the neurocognitive mechanisms of self-controlled practice during cognitive-motor learning”, was built upon the knowledge gained from Study 2 to further investigate how aspects of the practice environment, specifically the aspect of control, impact cognitive load and learning outcomes. Broadly, these studies illustrate how some of the neuro-cognitive processes related to information processing in cognitive-motor skills, specifically elements of the electroencephalogram (EEG), change with learning and the acquisition of skill.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleINVESTIGATIONS TO UNDERSTAND THE UNDERLYING BRAIN PROCESSES WHICH ENHANCE COGNITIVE-MOTOR LEARNING AND PERFORMANCEen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentKinesiologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledNeurosciencesen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCognitive psychologyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledalphaen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEEGen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledengagementen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledskillen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledthetaen_US


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