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dc.contributor.advisorFisher, John Pen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDreher, Maureen Len_US
dc.contributor.authorHill, Genevieve A-L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-25T06:32:47Z
dc.date.available2018-01-25T06:32:47Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2QV3C554
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/20419
dc.description.abstractEarly onset scoliosis (EOS) affects a vulnerable population of young children, and occurs at critical ages when the spine and thorax are developing. Children suffering with EOS have higher mortality rates due to cardiopulmonary complications; therefore, treatment for these patients can be life-saving. Pediatric growing rod constructs are an important treatment option for young patients with severe and progressive spinal deformities because they encourage growth and correction of the spinal curvature through successive lengthening procedures. However, growing rod constructs suffer from complication rates as high as 72%, which often lead to unplanned reoperations. To help prevent future failures of the same root cause, the failure mode and mechanism must be identified, which tell us how and why the devices failed respectively. This research included the first study to examine multiple, retrieved pediatric growing rod constructs from various sites to systematically investigate these significant items. The retrieval study revealed that rod fracture (failure mode) was due to bending fatigue (failure mechanism), and stress concentrations play an important role in rod fractures. The information obtained from the retrieval study enhanced the understanding of in vivo loading conditions experienced by the device and established clinically-relevant parameters for a mechanical bench model. This research also included the development and validation of a novel mechanical bench model that successfully replicated rod fracture due to bending fatigue. A mechanical bench model that is predicated on clinical outcomes can serve as a tool for engineers and researchers who are looking to improve pediatric growing rod constructs as it will enable them to make relevant predictions about the device’s resistance to failure. For example, the model was used in this research to investigate how the unique characteristics of pediatric growing rod constructs such as construct configuration and lengthening affect mechanical performance of the device. Key recommendations regarding surgical technique were identified in the retrieval study and verified through bench testing. The data obtained during this research can ultimately be used to reduce failure rates and unplanned revisions in this patient population.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFAILURE MECHANISMS OF PEDIATRIC GROWING ROD CONSTRUCTSen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentBioengineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEngineeringen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledBioengineeringen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledfailure analysisen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledgrowing rod constructen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledmechanical testingen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledpediatricen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledscoliosisen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledspineen_US


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