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dc.contributor.advisorLoughran, Thomas A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Jessicaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T06:45:22Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T06:45:22Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2901ZH61
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/20393
dc.description.abstractPolyvictimization, an individual’s experience of multiple types of victimization, has been of increasing interest in victimology over the past decade. Several studies have been conducted to examine the consequences of polyvictimization, but comparatively less attention has been paid to the risk factors for polyvictimization. Based on its relationship with offending and based on work highlighting the family as a salient context of victimization, the present study will focus on one particular potential risk factor: parental criminality. Using data from the National Survey of Adolescents, the thesis tests whether there is a relationship between parental criminality and polyvictimization. It also tests whether gender moderates that relationship, as little research has tested gender differences in risk of polyvictimization. Logistic regression models demonstrate a significant relationship between parental criminality and polyvictimization, but do not support the hypothesis that gender moderates the relationship.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleClarifying the Pathways to Polyvictimization: The Role of Parental Criminalityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCriminology and Criminal Justiceen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCriminologyen_US


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