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dc.contributor.advisorNewman, Rochelle Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorStockbridge, Melissa Dawnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T06:45:15Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T06:45:15Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifierdoi:10.13016/M2DN3ZX6N
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/20392
dc.description.abstractMild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) are typically viewed as those that do not result in prolonged periods of unconsciousness. Concussions, or the mildest form of brain injury, are the most prevalent in young children. Presently no single framework or screening assessment measure exists for language in young children. In this study, children who had recently experienced a concussion were compared with children who had no history of head injury on a battery of linguistic and cognitive-linguistic tasks. Group differences in both lexical- and discourse-level skills were identified, as well as domain-general cognitive skills. Significant differences were noted in category identification, phonological working memory, grammaticality judgment, segregation and selective attention to spoken instructions in the presence of a distractor, visually recognizing spoken targets presented in a short story, and visual non-verbal problem solving, all with moderate effect sizes. This research will inform classroom and in-home accommodations to assist children during the period of recovery.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLANGUAGE PHENOTYPING IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH CONCUSSIONen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentHearing and Speech Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledLanguageen_US


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