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dc.contributor.advisorBeier, Jonathan Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Amanda Maeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-23T06:45:09Z
dc.date.available2018-01-23T06:45:09Z
dc.date.issued2017en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2JD4PR0D
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/20391
dc.description.abstractBecause social exclusion leads to adverse effects, excluded individuals exhibit altered social information processing. In particular, these individuals process social information from faces differently than their included counterparts. However, the cognitive mechanisms leading to this difference are unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether or not a decrease in holistic processing, and consequent increase in attention to individual facial features, might characterize some of the observed effects of exclusion on how people process facial information. Adult participants were either excluded or included during a game of Cyberball and then completed the Vanderbilt Holistic Face Processing Task (VHFPT). Excluded and included individuals did not differ in performance on the VHFPT, suggesting that excluded individuals do not attend to facial features differently than included individuals. Results are discussed in conjunction with previous research and future directions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleINVESTIGATING THE INFLUENCE OF SOCIAL EXCLUSION ON FACE PROCESSINGen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledSocial psychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCognitive psychologyen_US


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