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dc.contributor.advisorSlevc, L. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorOkada, Brooke Misaoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T06:30:49Z
dc.date.available2017-01-24T06:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2D26B
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/18933
dc.description.abstractLearning and performing music draws on a host of cognitive abilities. One likely aspect of cognition that may be related to musical training is executive function. To date, many studies have investigated this relationship; however, results from such studies are mixed and difficult to compare. In part, this is because most studies look at only one specific cognitive process, and even studies looking at the same process use different experimental tasks. The current study addresses these issues by administering a well-validated EF battery of multiple tasks tapping each EF component (Friedman et al., 2008) and a comprehensive measure of musical training (Müllensiefen, Gingras, Musil, & Stewart, 2014) to obtain reliable measures of individual differences in EF and musical experience. Results suggest that there is positive relationship between musical training and performance on updating tasks, but this relationship is not observed with performance on inhibition or shifting tasks.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMusical Training and Executive Functionsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledCognitive psychologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledMusic educationen_US


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