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dc.contributor.advisorFrederik, Laurie Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHesla, Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-22T05:49:21Z
dc.date.available2016-06-22T05:49:21Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifierhttps://doi.org/10.13016/M2QR3W
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/18224
dc.description.abstractDrawing on historical research, personal interviews, performance analysis, and my own embodied experience as a participant-observer in several clown workshops, I explore the diverse historical influences on clown theatre as it is conceived today. I then investigate how the concept of embodied knowledge is reflected in red-nose clown pedagogy. Finally, I argue that through shared embodied knowledge spectators are able to perceive and appreciate the humor of clown theatre in performance. I propose that clown theatre represents a reaction to the eroding personal connections prompted by the so-called information age, and that humor in clown theatre is a revealing index of socio-cultural values, attitudes, dispositions, and concerns.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Idiosyncratic Body: Contemporary Clown Theory and Practiceen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTheatreen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledTheateren_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledclowningen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledClown theatreen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledcognitive studies and clownen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledcontemporary clownen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledhumor studies and clownen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledtheatrical clownen_US


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