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dc.contributor.advisorMansbach, Steven A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdler, Esther Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-08-27T05:31:20Z
dc.date.available2004-08-27T05:31:20Z
dc.date.issued2004-08-10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/1788
dc.description.abstractJosef Albers had an extensive and prolific career, both as an artist and a teacher. He was a crucial member of the faculties of the Bauhaus, Black Mountain College in North Carolina, and Yale University, producing a varied and ground-breaking body of his own work simultaneously. Albers's pedagogical philosophies were remarkably consistent throughout his teaching career, and all of his artwork reflects these philosophies to some degree. However, the artist's early engraved glass works, created while at the Bauhaus, and his later, architecturally-based sculptures were by far the most successful in communicating his message of the orderly, reasoned world he hoped transform through his art. Josef Albers was intent on challenging his viewer's "way of seeing," and he was able to accomplish this through his works with underlying architectural connections. These works allowed him to control the way they were perceived, and, by extension, the world seen figuratively through them.en_US
dc.format.extent2435381 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.title"A New Unity!" The Art and Pedagogy of Josef Albersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentArt History and Archaeologyen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledArt Historyen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledAlbersen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledGlassen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledArchitectureen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledBauhausen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledBlack Mountainen_US


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