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dc.contributor.advisorZacker, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorEllsworth, Chaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2004-06-04T06:11:21Z
dc.date.available2004-06-04T06:11:21Z
dc.date.issued2004-06-03en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/1577
dc.description.abstractFraternities, sororities, military organizations, athletic groups, and marching bands commonly are associated with hazing activities. Although such organizations have been linked to hazing activities, the fact that there is no common definition of hazing has hindered any real effort to challenge and combat such activities. The purpose of this research study was to investigate if the activities students define as hazing activities differ among the selected student organizations. The selected student organizations included fraternities, sororities, Reserve Officer Training Corps, NCAA athletic teams, and marching bands. This research study discovered statistically significant differences (p<.05) among the selected student organizations for physical hazing activities and psychological hazing activities, as well as statistically significant differences (p<.05) between women and men for physical hazing activities, psychological hazing activities, and other hazing activities. Finally, this research study found 10 activities students in the aggregate identified as hazing activities, which moves us toward a common definition of hazing.en_US
dc.format.extent706804 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleDefinitions of hazing: Differences among selected student organizationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCounseling and Personnel Servicesen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEducation, Higheren_US


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