Show simple item record

FOREIGN CULTURAL GROUP IDENTITY, STRESS, AND THE HEALTH OF BLACK IMMIGRANT WOMEN

dc.contributor.advisorSmith Bynum, Mia Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoamekpor, Lauren Ablaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-26T05:35:37Z
dc.date.available2014-06-26T05:35:37Z
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/15450
dc.description.abstractThis cross-sectional study investigated the with-in group differential in self-rated health and perceived stress among a sample of Black women from immigrant backgrounds (N = 180). Guided by Identity, the Multidimensional Model of Racial Identity (MMRI) and Social Determinants of Health theories, the relationship between age at arrival and Foreign Cultural Group Identity (FCGI) was assessed. Additionally, the utility of the FCGI measure was investigated. It was hypothesized that: 1) Foreign-born women who migrated to the U.S. as young children would identify less with their foreign culture than foreign-born women who arrived in later life, 2) foreign-born women would report lower levels of perceived stress and better self-rated health compared to U.S.-born women, and 3) FCGI would explain more of the variation in perceived stress and self-rated health than would nativity. FCGI was measured using a modified version of the Multidimensional Inventory of Black Identity's (MIBI) Centrality scale. The Cohen Perceived Stress Scale measured perceived stress and a one-item indicator measured self-rated health. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to test for nativity-based differences in self-rated health and perceived stress. The results revealed that age at arrival was not associated with FCGI, and significant differences in perceived stress and self-rated health by nativity were not detected. However, women with high levels of FCGI reported lower perceived stress levels and FCGI explained more variation in perceived stress than did nativity. FCGI was not associated with self-rated health, but women with low levels of perceived stress tended to report better health. Education was negatively associated with perceived stress. Generally, there was not a meaningful difference between nativity and FCGI with respect to their capacity to predict perceived stress. Nevertheless, these findings suggest important future directions for exploring linkages between comprehensive assessment of identity and immigrant health. The implications for policy, programs and epidemiological research will also be discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFOREIGN CULTURAL GROUP IDENTITY, STRESS, AND THE HEALTH OF BLACK IMMIGRANT WOMENen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentFamily Studiesen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledPublic healthen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledBlack Immigrant Healthen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledCultural Identityen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledPerceived Stressen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledSelf-rated Healthen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record