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dc.contributor.advisorSullivan, Denis Fen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOxford, Rebecca Len_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, Ruien_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-08T06:02:37Z
dc.date.available2011-10-08T06:02:37Z
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/11966
dc.description.abstractCurrently there is a lack of investigation into the language learning and language use strategies of non-native English speaking students at the graduate level. Existing literature of the strategy use of the "more successful" language learners are predominantly based on student data at the secondary school or college levels. This dissertation research project will use a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods ("mixed-methods" research) to examine academic English listening and speaking strategy use patterns of non-native English speaking (NNES) graduate students and also to investigate those students' relevant metacognitive thinking and its impact on their strategy use. First, this research project will investigate what kinds of strategies are being employed and how they are being employed to help those students achieve communicative competence in oral academic English. Descriptive statistics based on a large-scale database of questionnaire responses will be provided. Secondly, this project will investigate what factors have significant effects on the strategy use of this particular student group. Statistical tools such as the multiple regressions and path analysis are used to determine the effects of gender, academic fields, regions of origin, degree level, and other factors. Thirdly, this project examines students' metacognitive thinking and how it impacts their strategy use. The guiding theory related to this line of investigation is that students' metacognitive thinking is closely related to their strategy use patterns. Finally, this project also aims to validate a new assessment tool (a questionnaire) for investigating non-native graduate students' academic English listening and speaking strategy use. Results of the study are expected to eventually help build a descriptive model of listening and speaking strategy use of NNES graduate students and will inform learner-centered instructional design and curriculum development. The ultimate benefit will also be to help many NNES graduate students achieve at a much higher level in graduate school because of their improved English listening and speaking skills.en_US
dc.titleACADEMIC SPOKEN ENGLISH STRATEGY USE OF NON-NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKING GRADUATE STUDENTSen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.publisherDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_US
dc.contributor.publisherUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md.)en_US
dc.contributor.departmentCurriculum and Instructionen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEnglish as a second languageen_US
dc.subject.pqcontrolledEducationen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledacademicen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledEnglishen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledgraduateen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledinternationalen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledspokenen_US
dc.subject.pquncontrolledstudentsen_US


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