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Discrepancy between how children perceive their own alcohol risk and how they perceive alcohol risk for other children longitudinally predicts alcohol use

dc.contributor.authorDe Los Reyes, Andres
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Elizabeth K.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Frances
dc.contributor.authorMacPherson, Laura
dc.contributor.authorLejuez, C.W.
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-16T12:55:40Z
dc.date.available2010-08-16T12:55:40Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/10603
dc.description.abstractThis paper examined discrepancies between children's self-perceptions of the riskiness of alcohol use versus their perceptions of the riskiness of alcohol use for other children, and whether these discrepancies predicted children's future alcohol use. Participants included 234 children (M=11 years, 45.3% female) who completed baseline and one-year follow-up assessments on self-perceived riskiness of alcohol use, perceived riskiness of alcohol use for other same-age children, and own past year alcohol use. When considering child age and gender, baseline alcohol use, and the individual reports of the riskiness of alcohol use, the interaction between alcohol use riskiness reports prospectively predicted greater odds of alcohol use. The highest percentage of childhood alcohol use at one-year follow-up came from those children with both low self-perceived riskiness of alcohol use and high perceived riskiness of alcohol use for other children. Children's perceptions of multiple people's risk from alcohol use result in identifying important subgroups of children at risk for early-onset alcohol use.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported, in part, by National Institutes of Health grant R01DA18647 (awarded to C. W. Lejuez).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAddictive Behaviors;
dc.subjectAlcohol risken_US
dc.subjectCorrespondenceen_US
dc.subjectDisagreementen_US
dc.subjectInformant discrepanciesen_US
dc.subjectSubstance useen_US
dc.titleDiscrepancy between how children perceive their own alcohol risk and how they perceive alcohol risk for other children longitudinally predicts alcohol useen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtCollege of Behavioral & Social Sciencesen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtPsychologyen_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Marylanden_us
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, MD)en_us


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