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dc.contributor.authorProgram on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA)
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-15T17:48:15Z
dc.date.available2010-06-15T17:48:15Z
dc.date.issued2004-06-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1903/10118
dc.description.abstractWashington DC: Africans have a very favorable view of globalization, including foreign companies coming into their countries, and have a positive view of the influence of the United States. At the same time they feel they are not being treated fairly by rich countries in trade negotiations. Strong majorities endorse democracy, while feeling frustrated about the level of corruption in their countries. AIDS is clearly rated as their most serious problem. These are some of the findings of a new poll of 7,556 Africans in eight African countries– the Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and to a more limited extent, Egypt. The poll was conducted December 2003 through January 2004 by the international polling firm GlobeScan (formerly Environics International) and analyzed in conjunction with the Program on International Policy Attitudes of the University of Maryland. The study was sponsored by the World Bank and the Royal African Society.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectGlobalizationen_US
dc.subjectTradeen_US
dc.subjectCorruptionen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.titleNew Poll Finds Africans Favorable Toward Globalization, But Think Rich Countries Are Not Treating Them Fairlyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.relation.isAvailableAtDigital Repository at the University of Maryland
dc.relation.isAvailableAtUniversity of Maryland (College Park, Md)


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