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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/11939

Title: Controlling ammonia emissions from concentrated feeding operations
Authors: Satam, Chinmay Charuhas
Advisors: Ehrman, Sheryl H
Department/Program: Chemical Engineering
Type: Thesis
Sponsors: Digital Repository at the University of Maryland
University of Maryland (College Park, Md.)
Subjects: Atmospheric chemistry
Chemical engineering
Atmospheric sciences
Keywords: ammonia
chicken
dietary
nitrate
reductions
sulfate
Issue Date: 2011
Abstract: Ammonia is an essential component in the formation of particulate matter which has been a growing concern for areas along the Mid-Atlantic region. Also, animal husbandry operations have been isolated as the single largest sources of ammonia. Hale III (2005) suggests a strategy to reduce ammonia emissions from chicken manure using a dietary gypsum-zeolite infusion and slight crude protein reductions. A follow up study conducted by Wu-Haan et al. (2007) places the ammonia reduction values at 39 %. Simulations of this strategy for the MANEVU region find PM2.5 reductions of up to 37.5% for the Delmarva Peninsula. Additionally, 6 hours of improved compliance (15 μg/m3 standard) is seen in this region, during moderate PM2.5 episodes. It was also observed that regions near the source, and down wind, with high available nitric to sulfuric acid ratios are benefited by this strategy which primarily targets ammonium nitrates.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1903/11939
Appears in Collections:UMD Theses and Dissertations
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Theses and Dissertations

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